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How To Get 20% Off Film Products At Production Minds

September 17th, 2014

Production Minds Promo Banner

As Summer 2014 slowly winds down, lots of new film and video projects are now getting launched as the holidays are over and filmmakers and video creators are priming up for a huge Fall season ahead!

We have recently been in conversations with a few different companies who have built next-gen products for filmmakers and video creators to cost effectively manage their projects. Our goal is to secure deals for our members to help you all save money and time when working on your projects.

Today we share an offer generously provided by Production Minds which gives you 20% off any of their subscription packages. How to get the deal: Just go to this page, and click the “Try for Free!” button to get an account. Then you can upgrade your account to get all the juicy, premium features, and save 20% on a monthly basis by entering promo code “PMPSPIDVID” at checkout.

Visually learn more by watching the video below

What is Production Minds? It’s a creative collaboration platform and pre-production management system that gives film and video industry professionals (and semi-pros) a cutting edge tool to take care of every task from script development right up to the Director yelling “ACTION!”

Click here to take advantage of the Production Minds 20% off deal right now!

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5 Film Projects That You May Want To Work On

August 7th, 2014

LA Femme

I hope your Summer has been full of amazing things so far! Perhaps you are looking for opportunities to work on film projects? Below are 5 film projects on Spidvid that you may want to check out and bid on, or contact the project’s creator to get more info.

1. Tattooed Tears by Aaron Lewis is about a tattoo artist and client who share a tale of woe that leaves their lives forever changed between the shedding of tattooed tears. Talent needed: Actors. Project location: Chicago. View Tattooed Tears on Spidvid.

2. Wait, Wait, Don’t Kill Me by Adam Lippe is about an unknown virus spreading in a poor neighborhood. The infected victims crave water and that means going after the residents of the densely packed neighborhood in gruesome and ridiculous ways. Talent needed: Actors, producers, and an art director. Project location: Philadelphia. View Wait, Wait, Don’t Kill Me on Spidvid.

3. Puget Waste by Alec Frisch is about a fantasy world where time and logic do not co-exist. Two roommates Michael and Charlie are trying to make it big with their epic local Black metal/grunge band. Talent needed: Actors. Project location: Seattle. View Puget Waste on Spidvid.

4. LA Femme (pictured above) by Hoccomocco is set in 21st century LA, where a goddess turns femme fatale and gives sanctuary to a group of sacred artists. Talent needed: Actors, and a composer. Project location: Los Angeles. View LA Femme on Spidvid.

5. Tomorrow Waits For No One by Marcello Aurelio Lanfranchi is about Marcus Lazano, who is chased down by two thugs, is run over by Frank Cain’s car and awakens in the hospital with amnesia. Talent needed: Executive producer, and an agent. View Tomorrow Waits For No One on Spidvid.

If you have a video or film project that you need to attract talent to and build a team for, then post your project on Spidvid now.

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Investing 2 1/2 Years Into Creating a Web Series

July 30th, 2014

Axis of Action

I recently had the opportunity to interview Kyle Cowgill who’s the amazing creator of the series entitled “Axis Of Action” which just debuted today! This is an action comedy series about a couple whose everyday problems transform into huge explosive adventures. Think “Walter Mitty” meets “Mission: Impossible.”

1. What’s the story behind you wanting to develop “Axis Of Action” into a web series?

I walked out of Mission: Impossible Ghost Protocol completely amped up and wanting to make something like it. What a freaking great movie! That’s the stuff I love; spies, action, comedy, intensity. The other things I love are Calvin and Hobbes and Charlie Chaplin. If you mix those three in a blender you get Axis of Action.

2. Who are your team members involved with this project, and how did you attract them to your team?

If we’re talking about a group of people teaming together and saying “hey let’s pull our resources, pitch in and make an awesome web series”, then there were none. However I was able to find an excellent film mind, comedian and DP in Bob Christian. Amazing what gems you can find on Craigslist! Throughout the process he definitely became a member of the team and even directed much of the last episode. We’ve become friends and still work together.

3. What are the core goals for the series?

Have fun, be creative, and get better. Only the purest of motivations could get me to invest 2.5 years of my life and every penny I could earn into this. The professional goal was to stretch myself and tackle more ambitious material. I want to get better. There was also a goal to get on the front page of some top web sites; I wanted to slam this series on the table and show everyone I can play with the big boys. That was when I began, but now I’m just hoping for 200 views an episode!

4. What have been your biggest challenges and struggles to date?

As Bowfinger fans know, K.I.T. Keep it together keep it together keep it together. The western was a challenge all the way through, from writing to composing. I rewrote it and reshot it three times, and by that last time I’d reached such a mania that I nearly splintered the group and brought the series to ruin. You know what though? That episode is a lot of people’s favorite, and Noah gives probably the MVP performance of the series. But there were challenges with every episode. We had to reshoot the Silent episode entirely, and parts of the Spy, Kung Fu and Musical. (We almost reshot the Pirate episode, which would mean we shot the whole series twice basically, but upon trying to book the boat again I found that Captain Larry Beane had sadly passed away. May he rest in peace, he was a great and friendly man.) So I can’t give enough love to all those involved, especially Kelly Park, Bob Christian and Brian Cho.

5. How do you manage the project’s work flow?

The work flow was inefficient and unscheduled. In production, we’d just shoot when everyone could shoot. There was no timetable put on editing, composing or mixing. This is where I say I want money next time. For a web series, money is like food; yeah you can go without it for a while but you’ll have to lie down a lot. We lied down a lot.

Axis of Action

6. Do you have any tips or insights for producing a web series?

Do something that thrills you. Start with high expectations; some of them you won’t meet but some you will and you’ll be surprised. When I started Axis of Action, I was doubtful I could shoot on a Western set or a Pirate boat and had scripted out cheaper scenarios. Through research and determination I was able to do both. (***and hard earned money; after shooting the Western I had so little left I chose to walk home 13 miles from work instead of taking the bus so I’d have some money left over for food.) If you have a team of dedicated people, you’ll beat me to the finish line. If you’re a lone wolf like me, expect people to let you down and expect to let yourself down. Expect to want to quit, expect to question things you never thought you’d question. You’ll know when it’s bad. If you can stare it down and press on, you’ll make a web series that your friends will pretend to like in front of your face.

7. Where do you see the rapidly evolving web series space in 5 years years from now?

On the verge of a golden age. If we compare web series to the advent of film, we’re probably in the year 1905. Sorta gotten a glimpse of the potential, a couple good ones have been made, and people are starting to take notice. Going by that arbitrary calendar, we’ll probably start seeing artists press the genre forward in profound and popular ways here in the next five or ten years. They’re already starting. Once we figure out how web series are fundamentally different from TV, film and theater we’ll make real progress. Right now we’re all more or less copying or parodying our favorite movies, myself obviously included since that’s what my whole web series is about.

8. Where can we watch your series, and are there plans for a Season 2 or does it depend on how well Season 1 is received?

You can watch the series on my YouTube channel, and subscribe to be notified of the new episodes debuts. If you want a season 2, please say so in the comments! There are still stories to tell in this series, but I have several other projects written and ready to go so I’m not placing all my hopes and dreams on season 2. In the meantime I’m going to be making sketches and short films, all of which will be on my channel.

We thank Kyle for his insightful answers, and wish him all the best going forward with this fun series and his other projects now in development.

Enjoy this interview?! Great! Then subscribe to our blog via email as we will be doing more of these fun interviews in the future with other amazingly talented video creators, filmmakers, actors, writers, directors, animators, and producers.

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Getting to Know Film Actor James Lunddon

July 25th, 2014

James Lunddon

I recently had the opportunity to interview James Lunddon who has been an actor in various projects including the upcoming film “Necroland.” James has worked on many incredible projects including Transformers 4 and has got to work with Mark Wahlberg, Jack Reynor, and Pete Kelly.

You can enjoy our interesting Q and A below.

1. Did you grow up wanting to become an actor?

No, never thought of it but I did admire the actors. I grew up on John Wayne and Clint Eastwood. When John Wayne passed I cried. I did grow up dreaming of being a bodybuilder and did eventually compete ironically on a stage in front of an audience.

2. How did you break into the film industry?

I spent several years in acting school. It was my class mate that suggested I was ready to leave the nest and encouraged me to start auditioning. I remember my second audition I drove hours to. The audition had already passed but I emailed the assistant director anyways because I felt I fit the role of the Italian Father. They emailed me back and wanted an audition ASAP. I was extremely nervous but delivered the lines they gave me. Later that day I mentally beat myself up thinking I had blown that audition. At midnight I received a call from the AD that I got the role and were emailing me a script. I only had another 24 hours to memorize my lines and begin filming. I was told I would have a lead role starring with Brad Schmidt from “1968 Tunnel Rats” and “House of Lies”. Apparently, the person in the role was not what they were looking for but I was perfect. I guess persistence pays off.

3. What have you learned over the years to help you become a better actor?

The crew is there to make you look good not bad. You have to remember that. Experience has given me confidence and taught me to make my characters more compelling and believable. Time has taught me to bring truth to a character. Never stop honing your skills.

4. What kinds of projects do you look to work on?

I look forward to work on muti-million dollar projects and be sought after by the industry. Working on Transformers 4 was an incredible experience. Although, tt takes time building the acting portfolio directors are looking for.

5. What would be a dream project for you to be part of?

At the moment, I want to work with Michael Bay in the next Transformers 5 series. I met Michael on set for the T4 and was inspired by his directing. I made good friends on that set and impressed the other actors. I keep close contact with Pete Kelly who was in T3 & 4. After spending time chatting on set Pete pulled me into his scenes to help give me as much exposure on T4 as possible. It absolutely worked and my name spread across the internet and on dozens of websites in other countries. You can clearly see Pete and I in one of the T4 trailers and the movie. I want to return with a full role. So if anyone knows Michael tell him about me.

6. Have any tips for actors just starting their careers?

The best advice I received was from an acting manager in L.A. He said do something to get people talking about you. The more exposure in the public eye the better. Also, be patient and don’t take it personal you didn’t get a role. There is a role for everyone. Do your audition and walk away. Every thing else is out of your control. You brought your skills to the audition now let the rest fall into place. Learn to network in the industry with directors, writers, and other actors. It will help you get a step forward or the right edge.

7. Where can we learn more about you, and your projects?

You can find me at my official website at JamesLunddon.com or on IMDb. There you can find links to my Twitter profile, fanpage, and Instagram profile as well. I never thought I would see the day I would have fans. I have begun to build up a fan base and I enjoy keeping contact with them.

We thank James for sharing his story and offering some insightful answers, and wish him all the best going forward.

Enjoy this interview?! Great! Then subscribe to our blog via email as we will be doing more of these fun interviews in the future with other amazingly talented video creators, filmmakers, actors, writers, directors, animators, and producers.

And if you are a web series, TV, short film or feature film creator or producer and want your story and content featured here, then reach out to us and lets discuss.

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An Inside Look Into the Dramatic Series Camp Abercorn

July 15th, 2014

Camp Abercorn

I recently had the opportunity to interview Jeffrey Simon who’s the amazing creator of the series entitled “Camp Abercorn.” The show’s premise: What happens when a gay “Eagle Guide” turns 18? One of the many stories in a series about camp staff.

You can enjoy our interesting Q and A and watch the series trailer below, and be sure to check out Jeffrey’s Kickstarter campaign as well.

1. What’s the story behind you wanting to develop “Camp Abercorn” into a web series?

I was a Boy Scout for 16 years. I’m an Eagle Scout, a Vigil honor member of the Order of the Arrow. I spent three summers working on Boy Scout Camp Staff. It was my life.

I learned more from the Boy Scouts than any other institution. From my first leadership position at age twelve as patrol leader to my two years serving as Lodge chief, I learned that running an organization is messy; that not everybody agrees, especially on matters of morality and family values. I learned to voice my opinion strongly while respecting the positions of others. I learned to be self-reliant. I was surrounded by friends—brothers—who taught me when to speak with my heart and when it was best to keep my mouth shut. You could argue that in many ways I learned how to be gay.

I am in awe of what activist organizations like Scouts for Equality and their LGBT allies have done and are still doing to bring change to the BSA. Boycotts and activism can go far to change policy, but no amount of lecturing can change people. What can change people are stories. What can change hearts and minds are stories.

Through Camp Abercorn, I hope to inspire a new generation to take interest in scouting, remind veteran scouts and scouters how special camp is, and prove how the Boy Scouts can remain relevant in a modern America.

2. Who are your core team members involved with this project, and how did you attract them to join you on this journey?

Meg is this incredibly talented artist who can honestly do anything. She’s funny and smart and just makes everything better. We’ve been friends since college and decided a little over a year ago that we wanted to write something together. When we were brainstorming the idea of camp came up. I immediately said, “we’re going to write a show about Boy Scout camp staff.” And that was it.

We wrote a pilot episode and it was pretty solid, but I knew it needed more so I called up Matt.

Sometimes I think it’s just luck. At least I know I got really lucky. Matt Andrews (my Executive Producer) is incredible, and honestly I’d be lost without him.

We were both working together on a stop motion film together a while back and started talking about making something of our own together. WHAT to write took a little longer (there’s an idea for a musical, too), but we both knew we wanted to produce something.

I brought idea of Camp Abercorn to Matt and he loved it. The three of us have been doing this together for the love of it for over a year now.

I may be the face that you see talking about Boy Scouts and all that, but it’s all of our words. All of our ideas.

3. Why did you decide to do a crowdfunding campaign to raise capital for the project?

I like to think of Camp Abercorn as a project for all Boy Scouts. Going to the community both fits the message of the show as well as allows us to have “Final Cut” if you will. This is very important to me considering the sensitive subjects we’re discussing.

Crowdfunding is also the best option because of it’s marketing potential. Every contributor is a guaranteed viewer, so we’d already have an audience once the show airs.

Camp Abercorn Indiegogo campaign

4. What are the core goals for the series?

I want to make a show about camp staff that makes everybody want to work on a camp staff. To me it’s an experience unlike anything in the world. Having quality staff members means having a quality program for our youth and that’s what the Boy Scouts is really about—building men of character.

The obvious answer here is to fix the Boy Scouts membership policies. The BSA has effectively put an expiration date on our youth’s sexual orientation. It’s okay to be gay while you’re young and naive, but once you turn 18 you better straighten out or get out.

But with Camp Abercorn I hope to redirect the conversation away from executives in fancy offices and bring it back to the values of scouts and importance of camp as a place to explore your possibilities in life.

5. What have been your biggest challenges and struggles to date?

Funding. It’s as simple as that. We knew we had a good idea, but also knew that it was going to take a lot of effort to convince the world that we deserved their hard earned cash. That’s why we’ve taken so long to even get to the point of starting our Indiegogo campaign. Having our ducks in a row was so important.

6. How do you manage the project’s work flow?

Everything is about story for us. We spend a ton of time writing before we talk to anybody else.

It all starts with brainstorming sessions. We use only simultaneous editing software since there are three of us in three different places. We start by doing our breakdowns in Trello, then migrate to writing the actual scripts in Google Docs, and eventually to Final Draft for formatting and PDF creation.

As far as the actual filming process goes, we hired a thirty person crew. We had a casting director, held auditions, all of that.

I really respect the different aspects of the filmmaking process and the intricacies of each job. I wouldn’t dream of filming a web series without a qualified makeup artist, for example. Our production is run like any professional shoot. That’s really important in order to get the best work out of our actors and crew.

7. Do you have any tips or insights for producing a web series?

Web series have a bad connotation today. We’re taking the approach of making a show for the internet that’s comparable (as best we can make it) to a network or cable show.

Tips from us? Just go out and make something. But plan it out. Take your time with it. Don’t rush into anything. That’s where we’re coming from at least. It’s been over a year for us and we’re just now starting to fundraise!

8. Where do you see the rapidly evolving web series space in 5 years years from now?

Hopefully we see some better stories. There are a lot of comedy shows, but very few web series pride themselves on their storytelling abilities. Television isn’t going anywhere yet, but it will. There’s already a shift into on-demand. Scheduled programming (apart from live events like sports) aren’t appealing to the incredible busy public.

9. Is there a trailer we can see for Camp Abercorn yet, and when can we expect to see Season 1?

Yes, of course, our trailer is embedded below and on our Indiegogo page. We will also be releasing new videos over the course of the campaign which you can find on Indiegogo or our YouTube channel.

Assuming all goes well with the crowdfunding campaign we’ll get to filming right away this fall. We’ll keep you updated, but be on the lookout early 2015.

We thank Jeffrey for his insightful answers, and wish him and his team all the best going forward. And a special kudos to Matt Andrews who helped to make this interview happen!

Enjoy this interview?! Great! Then subscribe to our blog via email as we will be doing more of these fun interviews in the future with other amazingly talented video creators, filmmakers, actors, writers, directors, animators, and producers.

And if you are a web series, TV, short film or feature film creator or producer and want your story and content featured here, then reach out to us and lets discuss.

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